2017-04-22 / Front Page

No longer lost to history


Sons of the American Legion members from Post 192 turned out to help the Potter County Veterans Service Committee in a demonstration project as the committee prepares to launch its most ambitious project -- cleaning veterans’ grave markers all around the county. During the trial run, volunteers were able to restore the markers of Civil War veterans such as Cassius C. Warren. They also located the marker of prominent Revolutionary War veteran Major Isaac Lyman, which was unidentifiable until the volunteers got to work. Sons of the American Legion members shown at Private Warren’s grave are (from left) Tom Taylor, John Welsh, Matt Grossman, Dick Chapell and Ted Parsell, Sons of the American Legion members from Post 192 turned out to help the Potter County Veterans Service Committee in a demonstration project as the committee prepares to launch its most ambitious project -- cleaning veterans’ grave markers all around the county. During the trial run, volunteers were able to restore the markers of Civil War veterans such as Cassius C. Warren. They also located the marker of prominent Revolutionary War veteran Major Isaac Lyman, which was unidentifiable until the volunteers got to work. Sons of the American Legion members shown at Private Warren’s grave are (from left) Tom Taylor, John Welsh, Matt Grossman, Dick Chapell and Ted Parsell, A number of military veterans are buried in the Lymansville Cemetery on Coudersport’s eastern border, but the records that once identified them were destroyed in the 1992 Maple View Rest Home fire.

Earlier this week, Potter County Veterans Service Committee members Bill Simpson, Paul Heimel and Dawn Wooster were joined by members of the Potter Post 192 Sons of the American Legion on a mission to identify the graves and properly memorialize the service members.

It was scheduled as a demonstration project for a mission to clean the grave markers of hundreds of veterans all across Potter County, but it ended with some major historical discoveries.

Of particular note, the volunteers located and restored Major Isaac Lyman’s marker. Lyman was an important figure in the founding of Potter County and served with valor during the Revolutionary War. He died at Lymansville (now Ladona) in 1827. Matt Grossman and Tom Taylor from the Sons of the American Legion scrubbed a stone believed to mark Major Lyman’s grave and were thrilled to reveal his name on its surface.

Markers for three of the cemetery’s four Civil War veterans were also identified and cleaned. They included Uriah F. Glase, who died in the historic Battle of Fredericksburg (Va.) on Dec. 13, 1862; Thomas M. Sinsabaugh and Cassius C. Warren.


Lugene Heimel photos Lugene Heimel photos Sinsabaugh was wounded on May 25, 1862, in the First Battle of Winchester (Va.) and was taken prisoner. He also fought in the battles of Gettysburg, Chancellorsville, Kennesaw Mountain, Atlanta, and Peach Tree Creek. Pvt. Sinsabaugh was among the soldiers under the command of Gen. William Tecumsah Sherman in his 1864 March to the Sea. After the war, he became an engineer and settled in Sweden Valley. He died on Dec. 22, 1900.

Sons of the American Legion have been voluntary caretakers of the cemetery for many years. Post 192 annually places flags at the veterans’ graves in advance of Memorial Day. Research will continue and an ongoing veterans’ grave marker maintenance plan will be developed.

Meanwhile, the county committee is working with Eulalia Cemetery for a special veterans memorial service and kickoff of the countywide veterans grave marker restoration project on May 13. Details will be announced.

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