2017-11-11 / Front Page

Over 100 elk taken in hunt; little impact on herd


This elk shot by 68-year-old Alfred Hake of York County was one of three 800-pound specimens taken during this year’s elk hunt. The retired construction worker shot the bull in Clearfield County last Friday from a distance of 285 yards. Heaviest elk, an 833-pound bull, was taken in Cameron County. This elk shot by 68-year-old Alfred Hake of York County was one of three 800-pound specimens taken during this year’s elk hunt. The retired construction worker shot the bull in Clearfield County last Friday from a distance of 285 yards. Heaviest elk, an 833-pound bull, was taken in Cameron County. Another controlled elk hunt has resulted in all but 14 of the 118 licensed hunters killing an elk. Twenty-five antlered and 79 antlerless animals have been taken. An extended elk season for permitted hunters who have still not filled their tag concludes on Saturday, Nov. 11.

Pa. Game Commission officials are satisfied with the results of the hunt, which provides opportunities for winners of a license lottery while advancing the agency’s elk herd management plan.

There were approximately 1,100 elk in Pennsylvania entering the season, so the hunting season will have little impact on the herd, the agency said.

Ten of the bulls killed by hunters weighed 700 pounds or more and three topped the 800- pound mark. Shawn Latshaw of Franklin shot the heaviest elk, an 833-pound bull, which sported an 8-by-7 and was shot in southwest Cameron County. The largest “green score” bull was an 832-pound, 8-by-9 shot by Robert Cook of Earlville, N.Y. in Clearfield County. An 803 pounder donning a 6-by-7 rack was taken by Alfred Hake, of Manchester, also in Clearfield County.

The 118 hunters were selected from a drawing among upwards of 30,000 applicants. As has been the case every year, agency biologists extracted samples needed for chronic wasting disease testing. Results are expected early next year.

PGC distributed the licenses across 13 “elk management zones” zones encompassing parts of Cameron, Centre, Clearfield, Clinton, Elk, Jefferson, McKean and Potter counties. Many sections of the elk range were off-limits to hunters.

Pictures of elk, successful hunters and a map of the area in which each animal is killed are available on the Pa. Game Commission website’s elk check station link.

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