2018-12-01 / Front Page

Military values emphasized

Midshipman addresses Potter Post 192


U.S. Naval Academy Midshipman Second Class Darren Keglovits spoke at American Legion Potter Post 192 in Coudersport last week. He’s shown with his parents, Erik and Christie Buchanan Keglovits. Bill Pekarski photo U.S. Naval Academy Midshipman Second Class Darren Keglovits spoke at American Legion Potter Post 192 in Coudersport last week. He’s shown with his parents, Erik and Christie Buchanan Keglovits. Bill Pekarski photo Appointment to a U.S. military academy is a high honor for a teenager from a rural community, but few people realize what it can mean for not only appointee, but also the future of our nation.

Darren Keglovits, a Coudersport Area High School graduate who recently embarked on his third year at the U.S. Naval Academy in Annapolis, Md., spent his Thanksgiving break “on duty” for the Navy. His mission was to promote the academy itself, and by extension the importance and broad impact of military service.

Speaking at American Legion Potter Post 192, Midshipman Second Class Keglovits humbly expressed his appreciation for the opportunities provided for him, while extolling the character traits, values and self-confidence that a career in military service can instill. His specific assignment was to promote the academy itself.

“We get training and hands-on experience devoted to developing solid leadership skills,” Keglovits said. “We develop high ethical standards while gaining skill sets like navigation and cyber technologies that are cutting edge and just not available anywhere else.” Those who fulfill their commitment graduate debt-free with guaranteed employment,” he pointed out. “Additionally, the quality of education you receive is overwhelmingly ranked as one of the highest in the nation.”

But it doesn’t come easily, he hastened to add. Training is “extremely demanding -- physically, mentally and emotionally.” Privileges have to be earned and the regimen is sometimes “like cramming 28 hours of work into a 24-hour day.”

Progressing into his third year, Midshipman Keglovits is now focusing on career ambitions while enjoying additional privileges and free time. This past summer, he was eligible to participate in site visits to explore deployment fields.

Among his adventures were a stint on a submarine traveling from San Diego to Hawaii, flying in a fighter jet, and visiting Alaska.

Next year at about this time, he will choose which service avenue to pursue in completing is Naval hitch.

“It is important to note that graduation is not the end, but rather it is the beginning of your future and career,” he pointed out.

High school students seeking appointment to academies or other military service options would be wise to focus attention on STEM training – short for science, technology, engineering and mathematics, Keglovits advised.

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